[[gming]]

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gming [2011/03/15 21:02]
osj01
gming [2011/03/15 21:05] (current)
osj01
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==What Sort of Encounters?== ==What Sort of Encounters?==
The White City relies far more on human antagonists than most LARPs, they're easier to phys-rep and can show up everywhere without the usual fantasy ecology problems. On established roads brigands are your biggest threat, the same goes for cities, in uncharted wilderness you're still just as likely to meet new tribes of humans as you are to run into strange gribbles. On the other hand strange gribbles are always fun, check out the monsters page for ideas. The White City relies far more on human antagonists than most LARPs, they're easier to phys-rep and can show up everywhere without the usual fantasy ecology problems. On established roads brigands are your biggest threat, the same goes for cities, in uncharted wilderness you're still just as likely to meet new tribes of humans as you are to run into strange gribbles. On the other hand strange gribbles are always fun, check out the monsters page for ideas.
 +
 +=====Setting Specificities=====
 +
 +What with this setting being as close to non-standard as you're ever likely to get with a generic fantasy LARP there's a couple of things I think I should probably highlight and clarify for all y'all.
 +
 +
 +==Magic==
 +Magic is dangerous. Really dangerous. To both the user and the target. PC Sorcerers are nasty, a third level Blood Sorcerer can bind the Big Bad to herself by magic, hold a knife to her own throat and start negotiating. A second level Ash Sorcerer can turn your Big Bad into a pile of dust with a touch. Be aware of these things, and either find workarounds for them or just let them happen. By far the best way to avoid your archvillain being turned to ash/blinded by the glory of the Light/blood-tied to the party healer or whatever is to not have them show up unless you're willing to risk getting them offed. See the notes on "archvillain fatigue" above.
 +
 +Magic is still more dangerous in the hands of NPCs. A single NPC sorcerer can royally mess up a PC with a single effect (strike them blind, permanently bind them by blood, etc.). You should be very, very wary of using NPC sorcerers, and PCs should be very wary of tangling with them.
 +
 +
 +==Attitudes to Magic==
 +Magic is generally respected, but not terribly well trusted. Under the proper circumstances it is a pious activity, but only under the proper circumstances, and it's quite difficult for the layman to tell whether a given sorcerer is favoured by the gods or usurping their power to his own ends. Reaction to sorcerers, then, will go from quiet respect (for Ash Sorcerers, Light Sorcerers and, depending on the area, Chain Sorcerers) to fear and suspicion to outright terror and hostility (Glass Sorcerers). Openly casting spells can be a very good way to either really annoy somebody or scare them away. A fair few brigands will be unwilling to tangle with a sorcerer, but those in positions of authority will be inclined to keep rogue sorcerers under strict control.
 +
 +
 +==The Divine==
 +The Divine is something of a double edged sword. On the one hand it should be a real and pervasive presence in the setting, on the other hand PCs should not be facing Gods on anything like a regular basis. Followers and servants of the divine should be common, as should - much as I hesitate to use the word in this context - motifs which fit the powers involved.
 +
 +  * Portraying Ash: The presence of Ash and the Burned Lords should be felt anywhere death is in the air. The presence of the Ash Lords will be manifest through stillness, calm and the presence of flurries of ash. Servants of Ash and the practitioners of Ash Magic are quiet, grim and unassuming.
 +  * Portraying Blood: The Old Powers are felt in the wild places, the depths of the Western Forest and the heights of the Northern mountains. There is a vital energy to them and their servants, a visceral sense of being here and nowhere else. Particularly strong attention from the Old Powers can lead to wild growths of plants or sudden manifestations of blood. The Old Powers are more frequently encountered in person than most other deities, since they are firmly rooted in the physical.
 +  * Portraying Light: The Light is in many ways the opposite of the Old Powers. It is distinctly distant and otherwordly, which is probably a good thing because its attentions are often difficult to endure. The chief symbol of the attention of the Light is, funnily enough, Light. Servants of the Light are pure, otherworldly and ascetic things.
 +  * Portraying Wind: A sourceless breeze is a sure sign of the attention of the Princes of Breath. Strange behaviours of the air, freak weather conditions and the like are all indicative of the gaze of the Princes. Servants of the Wind are changeable, capricious, and occasionally even insubstantial.
 +  * Portraying the Bound Ones: The Bound Ones should never be explicitly described. There is a wrongness to them, a sense that they do not belong here. Because they don't. Chain Sorcerers can summon up lesser Bound Ones, which appear as indistinct figures bound with many chains. If they break free (or are freed) they adopt some physical form. There are few descriptions of these creatures, because few people are mad enough to summon them. Half remembered accounts describe either monstrous things from nightmare or things of angelic and inhuman beauty. The Bound Ones are best portrayed through noises off, the sounds of tortured metal and twisted chains.
 +  * Portraying the Vitriarchs: The word "shattered" is the one that best describes both the Vitriarchs and their servants. "Shards" is another, related one. Things of the Vitriarchs are broken, splintered and shattered. Their attention drives men mad.
 +  * Portraying Dream: Never the same way twice. There may not even be any Dream Powers, they may just be a figment of the imaginations of those who claim to have spoken to them.
 +
 +==Other Spaces ==
 +First, please note that anybody caught using the term "plane" will get their eyes plucked out with a LARP safe skewer. The only "plane" people are likely to refer to is "the Shattered Plain", which contains the Glass Tower where the Vitriarchs come from. It is possible for PCs to wind up in realms separate from the physical world, please note two things.
 +
 +Firstly, this is a big deal; most people never leave the physical realm except when dead or sleeping, some Dream Sorcerers wander the dream-realm fairly regularly but that's the closest you're ever going to get to people making frequent journeys beyond the physical. Journeys to the Burned Realm are rare but heard of, usually to plead with the Burned Lords for the return of a loved one. Nobody in their right mind goes to the Shattered Plain.
 +
 +Secondly, note that the number of otherspaces is strictly finite. Scholars recognise the existence of the Shattered Plain, the Burned Realm and Dream, and that's about it. It is possible that there is a realm of Light somewhere but nobody's found it yet, and the Priests of the Light insist that Light is a state of being rather than a place you can go to. There are no elemental planes, spirit worlds or even fæy realms, it's Ash, Glass, Dream or nothing.
 +
 +
 +==Naming Conventions ==
 +In order to make things more coherent, I'd like people to at least be aware of the naming conventions I've used in the world of the White City. Personal names are largely European (including English) with the nobility taking a Mediterranean tint. Place names and the names of most nonhuman races that aren't cribbed from the list of common fantasy gribbles are purely descriptive, "City of X" "People of Y" "Lady of P and Q" and so on. Similarly for Powers.
 +
 +
gming.txt · Last modified: 2011/03/15 21:05 by osj01
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